The following publications are a selection of outputs from CEM initiatives published by CEM initiatives supporting the Power System Challenge. Please check back periodically for updates.
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Clean Restructuring: Design Elements for Low Carbon Wholesale Markets and Beyond, May 2016
Released at CEM7 in San Francisco, the 21st Century Power Partnership’s latest report addresses key issues associated clean restructuring—the transition from traditional, vertically integrated utilities to competitive wholesale markets that rely on variable renewable electricity sources, demand response, and other clean energy options. An overview brochure outlines the report and examples from Mexico, Denmark, and Germany.

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Synchrophasor Applications for Wide Area Monitoring and Control, ISGAN Discussion Paper, ISGAN Discussion Paper, May 2016
This discussion paper describes synchrophasor applications for wide area monitoring and control in North America and Norway. It is the result of a collaboration of representatives from the United States and Norway, enabled through ISGAN’s Annex 6.

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Wheeling and Banking Strategies for Optimal Renewable Energy Deployment: International Experiences, a Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report, March 2016
This report defines the principles of wheeling (transmission) tariffs and renewable energy banking provisions and their role in renewable energy deployment in countries with plans for large-scale renewable energy. The paper reviews experiences to date in the United States, Mexico and India and discusses key policy and regulatory considerations for devising more effective wheeling and/or banking provisions for countries with ambitious renewable energy deployment targets.

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The Role of Smart Grids in Integrating Renewable Energy, ISGAN Synthesis Report, May 2015
This discussion paper explores the intersection of smart grid technology, policy, and regulation from a non-technical point of view, focusing on some specific questions relevant for decision makers. Based on emerging case studies from around the world, this discussion paper concludes that smart grids offer solutions to various challenges associated with variable RE, including providing additional flexibility, unlocking demand side participation, and deferring more costly grid upgrades.

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Solar Power: Policy Overview and Good Practices, CESC Policy Brief, May 2015
As global electricity demand increases, governments are designing and implementing policies to scale up and catalyze renewable energy, which now meets 22% of global electricity demand. Solar technologies are a critical component of this expanded deployment, and they have experienced unprecedented growth in recent years.

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Policies to Support Wind Power Deployment: Key Considerations and Good Practices, CESC Policy Brief, May 2015
Policies to support wind energy are often designed to align with broader objectives including diversification of electric generation sources to increase long-term price stability; reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and water use; and technology innovation to increase global competitiveness. Objectives specific to national and subnational contexts can provide broader framing for tailored design and implementation of wind power policies described in this paper.

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Power Systems of the Future, 21CPP Thought Leadership Report, February 2015
This report summarizes key forces driving transformation in the power sector around the world, presents a framework for evaluating decisions regarding extent and pace of change, and defines pathways for transformation. Powerful trends in technology, policy environments, financing, and business models are driving change in power sectors globally. In light of these trends, the question is no longer whether power systems will be transformed, but rather how these transformations will occur. Three approaches to policy and technology decision-making can guide these transformations: adaptive, reconstructive, and evolutionary. Within these approaches, the report explores the five pathways that have emerged as viable models for power system transformation. Also available as a two-page overview.

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TSO-DSO interaction: An Overview of current interaction between transmission and distribution system operators and an assessment of their cooperation in Smart Grids, ISGAN Discussion Paper, September 2014
The report is mainly aimed at decision makers in restructured electricity markets, where a clear distinction between Transmission System Operators (TSO) and Distribution System Operators (DSO) exists, but may also be useful for decision makers considering the re-design of vertically integrated utilities.

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The Evolving Role of the Power Sector Regulator: A Clean Energy Regulators Initiative Report, April 2014.
This report seeks to briefly characterize the evolving role of the power sector regulator. It describes seven existing objectives of power sector regulators and nine emerging objectives, highlighting key challenges and outlining interdependencies. As the preliminary installment in a series, it aims to lay the groundwork for subsequent reports and case studies that will explore these topics in depth.

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Global EV Outlook 2016, May 2016
This report from the Electric Vehicles Initiative aims to provide an update on recent developments in EV registrations (vehicle sales), EV stock estimates (mainly based on cumulative sales), and the availability and characteristics of EVSE. It also touches upon research aspects (e.g. the evolution of battery costs and energy density) and the profile of policy support in selected economies. The countries covered include EVI members and those included in the European Alternative Fuels Observatory. Access a fact sheet containing the reports key findings here.

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Feed-in Tariffs: Good Practices and Design Considerations, CESC Policy Brief, January 2016
Feed-in tariffs (FITs), along with renewable electricity standards, are one of the most widely adopted renewable energy support policies around the world. As of 2013, 98 national and subnational governments had implemented FITs, nearly three times the number that had adopted them in 2004. In recent years, FIT activity has focused primarily on revisions to current policies, underscoring the need for stable and predictable, yet flexible, policy environments. This policy brief provides a primer on key FIT design elements, lessons from country experience, and support resources to enable more detailed and country-specific FIT policy design.

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Renewable Electricity Standards: Good Practices and Design Considerations, CESC Policy Brief, January 2016
In widespread use globally, renewable electricity standards are one of the most widely adopted renewable energy policies and a critical regulatory vehicle to accelerate renewable energy deployment. As of 2014, 98 national and subnational governments had adopted RESs or similar renewable energy quota policies, a nearly ninefold increase from 2004. This Policy Brief presents best practice information on the introduction and implementation of RE standards. 

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Status Report on Power System Transformation, 21CPP Thought Leadership Report, May 2015.
Power system transformation is a complex, active process that is taking place at different rates and in different forms around the world. This transformation has multiple drivers, including technological advances, policy goals, and social change, and multiple enablers, especially policy, financial, and business model innovation. This report aims to bring the power system transformation picture into sharper focus, bolstering the evidence base for power system transformation by providing a collection of empirical examples of the types of innovations that are emerging around the world.

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Spotlight on Smart and Strong Power T&D Infrastructure, ISGAN Case Book, April 2015
The purpose of this casebook is to illustrate lessons learned and highlight a wide range of applications related to power T&D systems or smart grids. The examples are intended to support the value that smart grid solutions can offer in order to integrate renewable energy, improve the market, activate customers, and increase the security of the generation supply.

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Report on India’s Renewable Electricity Roadmap 2030: Toward Accelerated Renewable Electricity Deployment: Executive Summary, 21CPP Country Report, February 2015
Published with participation from 21CPP by the National Institution for Transforming India (NITI Aayog) with support of the Confederation of Indian Industry, Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation, and the Regulatory Assistance Project, this report outlines key recommendations and a framework for integrated policy strategy for rapid renewable electricity implementation that complements both existing and planned conventional power projects. The full report is available from the Confederation of Indian Industry.

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Making Coal Flexible: Getting From Baseload to Peaking Plant, 21CPP Report, January 2015.
Power systems in the 21st century—with higher penetration of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies—will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility. Such flexibility includes the ability to cycle on and off as well as run at low minimum loads to complement variations in output from high penetration of renewable energy. Can coal-fired power plants continue to operate cost-effectively if they cycle routinely? Yes, according to experiences from an actual multi-unit North American coal generating station. This flexibility requires limited modifications to hardware, but extensive modifications to operational practice. Also available in Mandarin.

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Flexibility in 21st Century Power Systems, 21CPP Report, May 2014
Flexibility of operation—the ability of a power system to respond to change in demand and supply—is a characteristic of all power systems. Flexibility is especially prized in twenty-first century power systems, with higher levels of grid-connected variable renewable energy (primarily, wind and solar). Research Highlights fact sheet.

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The Role of Demand Management in the Utility of the Future, 21CPP Dialogue Summary, April 2014
Demand management and distributed generation could transform how consumers interact with the electricity grid and manage energy. Energy consumers may be shifting to view themselves as both consumers and increasingly as suppliers – with renewable energy generation on-site and demand response capability. This new consumer model and the concept of a distributed energy system may be disruptive to the traditional utility model. It also changes the operation and management of the U.S. electricity grid. The Institute for Building Efficiency and the 21st Century Power Partnership hosted a Roundtable Dialogue on how utilities of the future can adapt to capture the greatest benefits for consumers and utilities without adversely impacting reliability, price, and power availability.